7 More Tips on Fighting Fatigue

Fatigue Section of  Better Late than Never BabySerena Kirby, a professional writer and AMA mom from Western Australia contacted us recently. Her new book called Better Late than Never Baby includes information and suggestions not found in other sources for expectant moms over age 35. We’ll share excerpts from her book with our audience and let you how you can get your own copy.

Serena Kirby

Serena Kirby, Writer and AMA Mom

7 More Tips on Fighting Fatigue (Part 2, a condensed excerpt from Better Late Than Never Baby by Serena Kirby ©2013)

  #1 Eat Up, Eat Well Input always affects output so good nutrition is important in keeping up your energy levels and battling fatigue. If you’re breastfeeding, nutrition carries an even greater importance, and it’s a good idea to eat as if you’re still pregnant.  Drink, drink, drink lots of fluids – at least 10 cups a day when pregnant and at least 13 cups when breastfeeding. You also need good nutrition and energy-generating foods to help your physical recovery from the birthing process (natural or caesarean) and to boost your immune system. It’s particularly important to make sure you’re getting enough iron in your diet so you don’t become anemic (one of the most common fatigue-causing medical conditions for new moms).  Your daily iron demand increases nearly 10-fold from the start of your pregnancy, but research shows that less than 25 per cent of women start their pregnancies with enough stored iron to meet their increasing nutritional needs. As such, by the end of the pregnancy, a large number of women are iron depleted if not anemic. If left untreated, the condition continues and often worsens in the weeks after giving birth, and the result is overwhelming fatigue. If you can’t get all the iron and other goodies you need in your diet, talk to your doctor or midwife about vitamin and mineral supplements.

#2 Hormones and Nutrition
If you’re an over-forty mom and feeling continually tired and moody, your fatigue may be being worsened by the prelude to menopause – perimenopause. Remember that during this time your body and your hormone levels are changing (as if puberty, pregnancy and breastfeeding wasn’t enough for one lifetime). To find out if perimenopause is contributing to your fatigue, speak to your doctor about having a blood test to check your hormone levels, but know that they are not completely accurate in showing smaller, subtle changes.  A more advanced and accurate method is the saliva sample test but not all doctors use it so you’ll need to call around to find one that does.

#3 Exercise
As strange as it sounds exercise is actually an excellent way of beating fatigue. You may be thinking, “Hell, I don’t have enough energy to get out of bed let alone run around the block”, but the truth is exercise has been proven to be highly effective in reducing fatigue. Whilst pushing the stroller around the block is good for your physical well being, many mothers suggest that exercising without your baby has the added bonus of providing a chance to truly switch off and be off duty.  You can let your mind wander without being disrupted by a child demanding your attention (yet again). Plan to exercise three to four times a week, preferably in the morning when you have more energy, and block out some time for exercise without your child. What to do with the baby? Most gyms have a childcare facility or ask a relative or friend to babysit.  Or go out early before your partner goes to work (you’re up anyway!).
#4 Conserving Energy
On the flip side of using energy to exercise is the saving of energy around the home.  Organize your home with items and systems that make life easier. Think of the home – especially the nursery – as a workplace (it’s where you’ll do most of your work in the first few months anyway) and spend time making sure you have everything you need exactly where you need it. Review and update your needs every few weeks because, as the baby grows so to will your routines and needs.
#5 Horizontal help
As simple as it sounds, research has actually shown that lying on your side to breastfeed considerably reduces fatigue. The reasons for this are possibly three-fold; it’s a more restful position, exerts less pressure on your perineum and requires less effort to hold the infant. While it’s not suitable for every mother to feed this way (and obviously not practical if you’re out of the home), it’s worth asking the midwife to show you how to do it and see what you think.
#6 Quality sleep
It’s important to remember that if you are to function properly during the day you need a good night’s sleep.  Being an older mother is tiring enough and without quality sleep you’re compromising your physical health, mental wellbeing and your relationship as well as the simple enjoyment of being a mother. Getting your baby to sleep through the night can require commitment and perseverance. If you’re having trouble, seek help as soon as possible. The longer you go with broken sleep, the more sleep deprived you will be. (So bite the bullet now before you want to shoot yourself with it.)
#7 Get Tested
If your fatigue is lingering and worsening even with the use of some fatigue-fighting techniques, visit your doctor. Don’t let medical professionals brush your fatigue aside, ask to be tested for any possible underlying medical conditions.

Get your own copy of this new book Better Late than Never Baby.