Why Practice Prenatal Yoga?

By Sarah Evans

If you are pregnant or thinking about trying to become pregnant, focus on taking care of yourself! After all, your body is designed to be the vessel to support the little life growing inside. How amazing! What an honor. What a perfect time to serve your body while it grows your baby.

Yoga is a wonderful tool for self-care. You will leave the practice feeling rejuvenated, more peaceful, and more emotionally connected with your baby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The long, deep yogic breath techniques are of utmost importance.

This mindful breathing:

  • nourishes the cells
  • increases lung volume
  • massages the organs and growing baby
  • calms the active mind of a woman preoccupied with thoughts of baby
  • connects us to our life-force and keeps us present

Having this knowledge and body awareness is priceless when handling the sensations of labor and childbirth, and the demands of mothering.

Endorphins are released in our bodies through the physical postures (called “asanas”). This eases the discomforts of pregnancy. Together, deep breathing and endorphins’ release foster relaxation. Having this knowledge and body awareness is priceless when handling the sensations of labor and childbirth, and the demands of mothering.

Yoga lowers blood pressure and improves circulation, which is even more important in a pregnant mama’s body since her blood volume triples. (Practitioners check regularly for hypertension.) It also improves balance, as a woman’s center of gravity constantly shifts as the belly grows. Coupled with gentle cardio activity like walking or swimming, yoga keeps your body toned and limber. Labor is hard work, so maintaining strength allows for more efficient labor and quicker recovery.

“Prenatal yoga gives us coping skills for pregnancy and childbirth. These skills and the friends we make are wonderful treasures to hold onto after our childbirth experiences.” -Sharon Munroe

The creation of community is an invaluable part of attending a prenatal yoga class. Meeting and listening to other pregnant moms establishes a support network, where students feel understood and don’t feel alone in their experience.

Co-founder Sharon made good friends and shared lots of ideas with our community by attending regular yoga practices with me for both of her pregnancies. My student/her yoga friend actually delivered her son in the same hospital on the same day as Sharon! They attend postnatal classes together now too. “Prenatal yoga gives us coping skills for pregnancy and childbirth. These skills and the friends we make are wonderful treasures to hold onto after our childbirth experiences.” said Sharon.

The most important piece of advice is to listen to your body during your yoga practice and follow what it’s telling you to do. Bring water to stay hydrated, choose a modification to a pose, ask your instructor for further guidance, or simply take a break if needed.


Becoming a mother is an amazing  journey. I firmly believe that the journey greatly benefits from the power of yoga. Come join us!

Get Moving: The Benefits of Prenatal Exercise and Suggested Activities to Keep You and Baby Healthy


Sarah Evans is an instructor at  Austin’s Yoga Yoga Northwest, teaching multiple classes each week in prenatal, postnatal and toddler yoga. She has helped hundreds of women learn to love yoga for over the last 7 years. She lives in Austin with her husband and two children.

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